• Adriana Paz

Karl expands english as a second language program

Many international students come to St. Martin’s Episcopal School to study abroad and are welcomed by the community. St. Martin’s offers various clubs, sports, and even a class that help the international students assimilate to their new home. One class is the English as a Second Language (ESL) program taught by Upper School English and ESL Teacher Megan Karl.

Karl welcomes new international students each year and works with them throughout their years at St. Martin’s.

“The international program is designed for students who speak English as their second language,” Karl said. “Each class is really intended to get them to do four things: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.”

Karl is certified in ESL and has been teaching ESL classes for three years. She began by working at an elementary school teaching Honduran students introductory English, according to Karl.

On a regular day, Karl teaches four classes designed for intermediate or high intermediate international students. She divides the classes based on proficiency in English.

“I figure out what we are going to be doing in that unit and divide them into little pieces so that we can achieve that goal,” Karl said.

Being an ESL teacher makes a positive impact on international students because they are there to support and give guidance to the new students who are still learning to adapt to their second language. Karl enjoys teaching foreign students not just the basics, but also the nuances of the English language.

“My favorite thing is to talk about books,” Karl said. “I like getting into deep questions and getting the students to figure things out on their own.”

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